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Decades After Discovery, 3,500-Year-Old Mummy Found in Egyptian Tomb Decades After Discovery, 3,500-Year-Old Mummy Found in Egyptian Tomb

Egyptian archaeologists working in Luxor have explored two tombs dating back to the 18th Dynasty, uncovering colorful figurines, funeral masks, a stunning mural—and a linen-wrapped mummy.

The Coolest Scientific Discoveries of 2017 The Coolest Scientific Discoveries of 2017

Science may be just a tool to help us understand our Universe. But we can all agree that one of its major perks is that it leads to the discovery of plenty of really cool, mind-boggling stuff.

Secret Time Capsule Found Inside Jesus' Butt Secret Time Capsule Found Inside Jesus' Butt

While preserving an 18th century wooden statue of Jesus, a team of Spanish restorers was surprised to discover a time capsule hidden within the hollowed-out ass portion of the carving. Written by a Catholic chaplain, the detailed document contains economic, political, and cultural information about the time period.

Ancient Cave Art Depicts Oldest Evidence of Dogs Wearing Leashes Ancient Cave Art Depicts Oldest Evidence of Dogs Wearing Leashes

A new analysis of ancient rock art demonstrates that humans hunted with dogs on the Arabian Peninsula over 8,000 years ago—and it looks like those dogs wore leashes.

Stunned Scientists Detect Suspected Hidden Chamber Within Great Pyramid of Giza Stunned Scientists Detect Suspected Hidden Chamber Within Great Pyramid of Giza

Though they were constructed nearly 5,000 years ago, the Great Pyramids of Egypt are still packed with secrets. Using a technique that leverages the power of cosmic rays, scientists have confirmed the presence of a large empty space within Khufu’s pyramid—a void that’s signaling the presence of a possible hidden…

Historians May Have Been Wrong About This Ancient Roman Vase for Centuries Historians May Have Been Wrong About This Ancient Roman Vase for Centuries

New research shows that the British Museum’s most famous artifact—the Portland Vase—was manufactured by a different technique than the one traditionally assumed by historians and archaeologists.

Ancient Skull Fragment Likely Belongs to Oldest Known Tsunami Victim Ancient Skull Fragment Likely Belongs to Oldest Known Tsunami Victim

A 6,000-year-old skull found in Papua New Guinea is the earliest record of a human killed in a tsunami, according to new research published this week.

Neanderthals With Disabilities Survived Through Social Support Neanderthals With Disabilities Survived Through Social Support

A re-analysis of a 50,000 year old Neanderthal skull shows that, in addition to enduring multiple injuries and debilitations, this male individual was also profoundly deaf. Yet he lived well into his 40s, which is quite old by Paleolithic standards. It’s an achievement that could have only been possible with the help…

Experts Cast Doubt On Viking Textile With ‘Allah’ Inscription Experts Cast Doubt On Viking Textile With ‘Allah’ Inscription

Researchers from Sweden made headlines last week after claiming to have found the Arabic characters for “Allah” and “Ali” woven into Viking burial costumes. The discovery suggested a more intimate cultural relationship between the Vikings and the Arab world, but some experts are now questioning key assertions made by…

Restored Prisoner’s Letter Uncovers Horrific Details of Life at Auschwitz Death Camp Restored Prisoner’s Letter Uncovers Horrific Details of Life at Auschwitz Death Camp

In 1944, Marcel Nadjari—a Greek Jew who was forced to remove bodies from the Auschwitz gas chambers—buried a letter in a forest near the camp. The text was rediscovered in 1980, but it was virtually unreadable. Using a new imaging technique, scientists have finally reconstructed the letter, and it’s providing…

Humans Today Have Even More Neanderthal DNA Than We Realized Humans Today Have Even More Neanderthal DNA Than We Realized

A international team of researchers has completed one of the most detailed analyses of a Neanderthal genome to date. Among the many new findings, the researchers learned that Neanderthals first mated with modern humans a surprisingly long time ago, and that humans living today have more Neanderthal DNA than we assumed.

There May Be Seven Incredibly Rare Bronze Statues Buried At the Antikythera Shipwreck There May Be Seven Incredibly Rare Bronze Statues Buried At the Antikythera Shipwreck

A trove of new artifacts have been recovered from the Roman-era wreck that yielded the mysterious Antikythera Mechanism, including an arm made of bronze and a strange metal disc. But most intriguing of all, the latest survey suggests that seven bronze statues are still waiting to be discovered.

Sunken German Submarine From WWI Likely Contains Remains of 23 Sailors Sunken German Submarine From WWI Likely Contains Remains of 23 Sailors

Marine archaeologists have discovered a German submarine off the coast of Belgium in the North Sea. The U-boat dates back to the First World War, and its near-pristine condition suggests the remains of all 23 sailors are still inside.

Origin of Zero Symbol Is Centuries Older Than Previously Thought Origin of Zero Symbol Is Centuries Older Than Previously Thought

The number zero is something we all take for granted, yet its conceptual origin has eluded archaeologists and historians. An updated analysis of an ancient Indian manuscript is shedding new light on this longstanding mystery, showing that the symbol that would eventually evolve into the number zero emerged at least…

Genetic Analysis Offers First Strong Evidence of Female Viking Warriors Genetic Analysis Offers First Strong Evidence of Female Viking Warriors

Stories and poems from the Medieval era contain accounts of fearsome female Viking warriors, yet historians and anthropologists have argued that such accounts are based in myth. A DNA analysis of a 10th century skeleton found in an iconic Swedish Viking Age grave suggests there’s some truth to these old tales—and that…

New Experiment Reveals Secret Behind 200,000-Year-Old Neanderthal Glue New Experiment Reveals Secret Behind 200,000-Year-Old Neanderthal Glue

Over a hundred thousand years ago, Neanderthals used tar to bind objects together, yet scientists have struggled to understand how these ancient humans, with their limited knowledge and resources, were able to produce this sticky substance. A new experiment reveals the likely technique used by Neanderthals, and how…

Italians Have Been Getting Blitzed on Wine for a Very Long Time Italians Have Been Getting Blitzed on Wine for a Very Long Time

When we think about wine in Italian history, we think of the booze-soaked bacchanalias of ancient Rome. But it turns out that Italians were using wine to get their drunk on long before that, as evidenced by an exciting new discovery of the region’s oldest vino near a Copper Age site in Sicily. It’s a spicy meatball…

The Surprising Way a Confederate Submarine Crew Died at the Hands of Its Own Weapon The Surprising Way a Confederate Submarine Crew Died at the Hands of Its Own Weapon

During the latter stages of the American Civil War, the H.L. Hunley made history by becoming the first combat submarine to sink an enemy ship. The Confederate crew never returned from its mission, sparking a mystery that’s lasted for over 130 years. An exhaustive new analysis suggests these pioneering submariners…

Hundred-Year-Old Antarctic Fruitcake Found in 'Excellent Condition' Hundred-Year-Old Antarctic Fruitcake Found in 'Excellent Condition'

Conservators with Antarctic Heritage Trust have uncovered a perfectly preserved fruitcake that dates back to Robert Falcon Scott’s ill-fated Terra Nova expedition, which began in 1910.

Bone Etchings Suggest Ancient Cannibals Weren’t Just Doing It For the Meat Bone Etchings Suggest Ancient Cannibals Weren’t Just Doing It For the Meat

Distinctive zig-zag etchings on a prehistoric human bone found at Gough’s Cave in England suggests that Ice Age cannibals consumed human flesh not purely for the nutritional value, but as part of a sophisticated funeral practice.

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