Kelsey Campbell-Dollaghan's posts - Greek uPOST

How Video Games Might Actually Help Our Brains How Video Games Might Actually Help Our Brains

In October, 29,000 neuroscientists gathered in Chicago to discuss new research in their sprawling field at the Society for Neuroscience’s annual meeting. Amid mountains of abstracts on every conceivable aspect of brain science, there were a surprising number of studies about an unlikely subject: video games.

The Quest to Design a Satellite That Destroys Itself When the Mission Ends

Satellites are built to endure decades in the most inhospitable conditions in the known universe. Paradoxically, engineers are now trying to figure out how to design them so that they do melt—planned obsolescence at 200 miles above the Earth.

Three Surprising Parts of the World Where Air Pollution Decreased

Thanks to a super-sensitive new tool, NASA can now see exactly where air pollution is increasing and decreasing–down to the level of neighborhoods–and in some cases, the results are surprising.

Japan's Olympic Stadium Debacle May Change the Way Cities Build Sports Venues  Japan's Olympic Stadium Debacle May Change the Way Cities Build Sports Venues 

After years of controversy, Japan’s Sport Council has chosen a new design for an Olympic stadium in Tokyo. It will be be smaller, more sensitive to its surroundings, and (relatively) inexpensive—and it could be a model for other host cities.

The Ancient Material That's Being Used To Develop Earthquake-Proof Skyscrapers? Wood.  The Ancient Material That's Being Used To Develop Earthquake-Proof Skyscrapers? Wood. 

Some of the fastest-growing cities in the world sit in high-risk earthquake zones. That’s why researchers are trying to figure out how to build tall buildings using a material that’s not only plentiful and renewable, but even more resistant to earthquakes than conventional building materials.

What the Computer Chip of the Future Shares With Skyscrapers of 100 Years Ago What the Computer Chip of the Future Shares With Skyscrapers of 100 Years Ago

Tall buildings were the vanguards of the modern world. They completely changed how cities functioned, bringing forth totally new social and urban systems. The reasons they changed cities are surprisingly similar to the reasons they may change the way computer memory is built.

A Cemetery In a Warehouse Solves a Serious Problem In Cities: Where to Put the Dead  A Cemetery In a Warehouse Solves a Serious Problem In Cities: Where to Put the Dead 

In Hong Kong, finding the space to bury the dead is a huge ongoing problem. New, unconventional projects are springing up to meet demand–giving us a glimpse at the future of burial in the hyper-dense cities.

The Project To Monitor Bridges and Infrastructure From Space Is Growing  The Project To Monitor Bridges and Infrastructure From Space Is Growing 

A few months ago, the European Space Agency and the University of Nottingham described a new project that would use satellites to monitor aging, at-risk piece of infrastructure was at a given moment, right down to the centimeter. Now, more countries want in.

Why Climate Scientists Are So Intrigued By the Brutal Sea Voyages of the 19th Century Why Climate Scientists Are So Intrigued By the Brutal Sea Voyages of the 19th Century

Life aboard a ship in the 18th or 19th century—especially in the far north or south—was treacherous. Now, the records of these brutal voyages are playing a surprising role in scientists’ efforts to understand the future of the planet.

The Fascinating Reason Why the Coldest Days of the Year Vary So Wildly In the US The Fascinating Reason Why the Coldest Days of the Year Vary So Wildly In the US

Statistically, the coldest days of the year should be a pretty simple thing to map. So why does this map look so splotchy?

How Three Countries Being Engulfed By The Ocean May Relocate To Survive How Three Countries Being Engulfed By The Ocean May Relocate To Survive

Right now, world leaders in Paris are trying to stop climate change from altering the world inexorably. But for hundreds of thousands of people who live in some low-lying nations, it’s already late in the game.

It Took 55 Miles of Sewing Thread To Create This Complete Spectrum of Visible Color  It Took 55 Miles of Sewing Thread To Create This Complete Spectrum of Visible Color 

How do you sew up a seam that hangs 20 feet above your head? You develop your own, industrial-sized needle–like the artist Gabriel Dawe did to finish this installation.

7 Installations Protesting Climate Change In Paris, Even If Actual Protesters Can't 7 Installations Protesting Climate Change In Paris, Even If Actual Protesters Can't

The entire world is watching as politicians pour into Paris today to decide the future of the Earth. But you might have missed what’s going on outside the summit, where dozens of activists and artists have transformed the city with installations about climate change.

Singapore Is Turning a Cross-Country Railroad Into the World's Longest High Line Singapore Is Turning a Cross-Country Railroad Into the World's Longest High Line

Singapore, like almost every other industrialized country, is home to railroads that once formed the bedrock of its modern economy. Nowadays? Not so much.

London's New Bridge For Pedestrians Solves a Common Problem With Clever Engineering London's New Bridge For Pedestrians Solves a Common Problem With Clever Engineering

It’s by design that most modern cities grew up around rivers or coastlines. But today, those bodies of water pose problems for thousands of commuters who’d prefer to ride or walk–and cities are developing new infrastructure to bridge them.

The Forgotten History Behind Some of America's Busiest Airports The Forgotten History Behind Some of America's Busiest Airports

Are you flying through LGA, ATL, or ORD today? It turns out each of these airports has a bizarre and little-known backstory.

This Beautiful App Lets You See the Cell Towers, Wifi Signals, and Satellites Around You

You’re aware that your cell service comes from cell towers. And that your mapping app is made possible by GPS satellites. And that wifi signals deliver your fail videos. But the sight of that invisible world is breathtaking.

Thermoelectric Ikea Furniture Could Charge Your Phone With Energy From Your Coffee

Your computer, your gaming console, even your cup of coffee—all of these objects in your house radiate heat, which promptly goes to waste. But what if your kitchen table or console cabinet contained the thermoelectric hardware to turn that heat into usable electricity?

The Secret History of Silicon Valley and the Toxic Remnants of the First Computers  The Secret History of Silicon Valley and the Toxic Remnants of the First Computers 

Today, Silicon Valley is a dreamy officescape, a place where ideas and networks are currency. But in the 1960s and 70s, Silicon Valley proper manufactured hardware–and this industrial boom created one of the most polluted places in America.

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